• Children’s Advocacy Center marks 10 years

    By Christopher Dornblaser, York Dispatch

    After a decade serving vulnerable youth of York County, the Children’s Advocacy Center officially took ownership of its South Queen Street building Thursday.

    The county used a grant in 2006 to purchase the building for use by the center. Under the terms, if the center used the building for the next 10 years, it could assume ownership.

    That happened last week during a small ceremony in which the center’s board president, Fairview Township Police Chief Jason Loper, was given a ceremonial golden key to the building at 28 S. Queen St.

    Loper, formerly a detective with his department, commended the effects the advocacy center has had on the handling of child abuse cases. Loper said that before becoming chief, he dealt with child abuse cases and worked with the advocacy center during those times.

    The chief said before the center came into existence, all of the organizations that deal with a case of child abuse might have had to speak with the victim individually. The center provides a location for the children where all organizations can be centrally involved.

    “It’s so much easier on the kids and families,” Loper said.

    He added that children can even receive medical exams there.

    “It’s a much more uniform process,” he said, comparing it to how cases were handled before the center existed.

    4,100 kids: In 10 years, the center has assisted about 4,100 children. Executive Director Deb Harrison called the caseload a challenge, but she said the people in the organization are happy they have been there for the kids.

    The number of children they have helped this year is about 800, Harrison said, an increase from the 684 assisted in 2015.

    She said the center serves as a “first step” for kids in the child abuse cases, and the center’s trained interviewers speak with them first. Harrison said at one point the center dealt within a smaller age range, but in recent years the coverage was changed so it deals with all York County minors, ages 3 to 17, for child abuse cases.

    “That change was really good,” she said.

    York County President Commissioner Susan Byrnes was among the many attending the event. She praised the work being done at the center.

    “Unfortunately, it’s very valuable work,” she said.

    Byrnes said that without the center, potential abuse victims would be sent to the emergency room.

    “I think it would be much scarier for the children,” she said.

    Byrnes described the center as having a “home” feeling and setting, which helps children feel more comfortable.

    “We’re very lucky in York County to have this,” she said.

    http://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/2016/12/16/childrens-advocacy-center-marks-10-years/95491880/

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  • Clearfield CAC Hosts Open House with PCCD Chairman Josh Shapiro & PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Minimal Facts Training

    Grand Opening Picture

    Pictured right to left:  Connie Miller, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Program Manager & Trainer; Randi Reichard, Forensic Interviewer; Christine Semelsberger, Forensic Interviewer; Mikele Bay, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Vice President & Trainer; Tonya Weitoish, CYFS Supervisor; Melinda Noel, Forensic Interviewer; Mary Tatum, CAC/MDIT Coordinator; Drena Pry, CFO of CenClear; Josh Shapiro, PCCD Chairman; William Shaw Jr., District Attorney; Pauline Raab, CEO of CenClear; and Jendi Schwab, Assistant District Attorney

    On Tuesday, August 16, 2016, Clearfield Children’s Advocacy Center welcomed Josh Shapiro, Chairman of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD); as well as Connie Miller and Mikele Bay, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs trainers, as part of the PA Chapter of CACs /MDITs statewide Minimal Facts Interview Training program.

    The PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs designed the Minimal Facts Training program to help counties throughout Pennsylvania better understand the importance of having a trained professional conduct the Minimal Facts Interview of a child.

    Minimal Facts Interviews conducted by a trained professional helps:

    • Protect disclosure;
    • Avoid interview duplication;
    • Reduce trauma;
    • Reduce taint;
    • Protect evidence;
    • Ensure Best Practices intervention for alleged child abuse victims.

    If your county is interested scheduling, or learning more about the Minimal Facts Interview Training program please contact Alison Gray, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Executive Director at alisongray@penncac.org.

    Clearfield MFI Training Smaller Image

    Pictured right to left:  Connie Miller, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Program Manager & Trainer; Drena Pry, CFO of CenClear; Mikele Bay, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs; Melinda Noel, Forensic Interviewer; and Pauline Raab, CEO of CenClear
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  • PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Presents Minimal Facts Interview Training for Clarion, Forest & Jefferson Counties

    Clarion, Forest & Jefferson Counties MFI Training

    Pictured left to right:  Pat Berger, Director, Western PA Cares for Kids; Jeff Burkett, Jefferson County District Attorney; Connie Miller, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Program Manager & Trainer; Mikele Bay, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Vice President & Trainer

    The PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs designed the Minimal Facts Training program to help counties throughout Pennsylvania better understand the importance of having a trained professional conduct the Minimal Facts Interview of a child.

    Minimal Facts Interviews conducted by a trained professional helps:

    • Protect disclosure;
    • Avoid interview duplication;
    • Reduce trauma;
    • Reduce taint;
    • Protect evidence;
    • Ensure Best Practices intervention for alleged child abuse victims.

    If your county is interested scheduling, or learning more about the Minimal Facts Interview Training program please contact Alison Gray, PA Chapter of CACs/MDITs Executive Director at alisongray@penncac.org.

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  • Erie Gives – Donate Today

    people-holding-thank-you-sky-many-word-33681268

    The PA Chapter of CACs and MDTs raised $1,213.00 on Erie Gives Day because of the generous support of our CACs, MDITs and the community.

    Thank you for helping us help the children of Pennsylvania!


    Support the PA Chapter of CACs & MDTs through Erie Gives on Tuesday, August 9, 2016.

    Day and Time: The event takes place on August 9. You have 12 hours to make your donation between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. EST.

    Gift Amount: The minimum gift is $25. There is no limit to the amount of money you may give. There is no limit to the number of organizations you can donate to in a transaction.

    Credit Cards: Only Visa, MasterCard and Discover will be accepted. The credit card processor charges a nominal fee per transaction. The Erie Community Foundation does not receive any fees. Sorry, credit card gift cards will not be accepted.

    How to Give: Go to ErieGives.org

    Learn More

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  • Child Advocacy Center Outreach/Forensic Interviewer (Part Time)

    This notice is to announce the opening for a part time (28 hours per week) CAC Outreach/Forensic Interviewer to work the CAC in Montrose, PA.

    Interested individuals should submit a cover letter with salary requirements and resume to:

    Janyne Gurnari, PHR, Chief Operating Officer
    FSA NEPA
    31 West Market Street
    Wilkes-Barre PA 18701
    Fax:  570-829-5054
    Email:  jgurnari@fsanepa.org

     Full job description and requirements

     

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